Thursday, August 7, 2008

The Mud Mountain Fire Revisited

The picture above is our recreational property (The Mud Mountains) in July 2007 right after the forest fire burned it. There used to be sage brush taller than Derek where Connor is standing. We revisited this year at the end of July and the following pictures show what a year can do.
This was taken looking in the same direction that the picture of Connor was taken the year before -- I think. No signs of sage brush but there is growth!
Underneath these scrub oak new scrub oak are appearing but there are some spots that got so hot that the roots didn't make it either.
Being directionally challenged, I can't exactly tell you where on the property this is but it's intersting anyhow -- right?
Finally, even burnt the property has great views and it's own wild beauty -- just no shade -- great for tanning. My Dad was there and enjoyed finding, and identifying, animal tracks and plants. The deer tracks even I could find. The bear tracks took a more experienced tracker. The funny thing was that the road was more overgrown than the rest of the property since it didn't really burn the first time. We rode on it anyhow. Let us know if you ever want to see the affects of the fire first hand -- just try to pick a cool / shady day.

4 comments:

Megz said...

So glad you don't have a pile of ash anymore! And once you build your ginormous cabin with covered deck and porch, there will be plenty of shade for me to enjoy.

T said...

hope springs eternal :)

or at least that's the lovely feel good lesson I would be taking away from your post were it not for a lovely evening consisting of pack meeting, choir practice, and the orthodontists' swimming party. Tomorrow maybe hope will spring eternal!

cold cocoa said...

Wow. Those flowers were just the ones I need in front of my porch! Great to see the rebirth of life on your property.

LC said...

Isn't green beautiful?..and with the contrasting haunting black tree trunks? wow.
What a view to enjoy from that ginormous cabin with 3-story windows.